Atlantic City, New Jersey

HomeNew JerseyAtlantic City

Email Andrew D'Arcy Andrew D'Arcy on LinkedIn Andrew D'Arcy on Twitter Andrew D'Arcy on Facebook
Andrew D'Arcy
Andrew D'Arcy
Attorney • (609) 641-6200



A Nurse Assist IV flush  syringe  recall was announced by the FDA on October 4, following several reports that indicate patients developed Burkholderia cepacia bloodstream infections after receiving saline flushes from prepackaged syringes.

Burkholderia  cepacia is a group of complex bacteria that can be found in soil and water and is often resistant to many common antibiotics, posing an increased risk to those with weakened immune systems such as children and the elderly.

The recall applies to four types of flush syringes that were distributed between Feb.16 and Sept. 30 this year.  The recalled syringes are prepackaged saline flushes used in a healthcare setting to administer intravenous treatments, clearing central or arterial lines of any medicine or perishable liquids that could pose a sterilization hazard.

So far, the Delaware Division of Public Health has detected infections in three residents, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has identified 10 cases, the New Jersey Department of Health has identified two cases and the Pennsylvania Department of Health has reported 20 cases.

The FDA has announced all unexpired lots of the Nurse Assist saline flush syringes are included in the recall until a thorough investigation by the FDA and the manufacturer can determine the source of the contamination and specifically pinpoint impacted lots.

Nurse Assist  is urging all healthcare facilities with affected products to discontinue use and return the product to Nurse Assist for a credit by contacting Nurse Assist Customer Service at 1-800-649-6800 ext. 10. Nurse Assist Inc. has announced customers and distributors are being notified through email, phone, and certified mail with instructions for returning the product.

Leave a Comment

Have an opinion? Please leave a comment using the box below.

For information on acceptable commenting practices, please visit Lifehacker's guide to weblog comments. Comments containing spam or profanity will be filtered or deleted.